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The Gospel of Loki: A Novel by Joanne Harris - PDF and EPUB Download



- Why is this book worth reading? - What are the main themes and features of the book? H2: Summary of The Gospel of Loki - How does the book retell the Norse myths from Loki's perspective? - What are the main events and characters in the book? - How does the book end and what is the message? H2: Analysis of The Gospel of Loki - How does the book use humor, irony and sarcasm to portray Loki's character? - How does the book explore the concepts of fate, free will and chaos? - How does the book compare and contrast Loki with other gods and characters? H2: Evaluation of The Gospel of Loki - What are the strengths and weaknesses of the book? - How does the book appeal to different audiences and readers? - How does the book relate to contemporary issues and culture? H2: Conclusion - What are the main points and takeaways from the book? - How does the book rank among other works by Joanne Harris and other fantasy novels? - Where can readers find more information and resources about the book? H2: FAQs - Who is Loki in Norse mythology? - What is an EPUB file and how can readers access it? - What are some other books by Joanne Harris that readers might enjoy? - What are some other books that retell myths from different perspectives? - What are some online platforms and communities where readers can discuss The Gospel of Loki and other fantasy books? Article with HTML formatting Joanne Harris The Gospel of Loki EPUB: A Review




If you are a fan of Norse mythology, fantasy novels, or witty and sarcastic narrators, you might want to check out Joanne Harris' The Gospel of Loki. This book is a retelling of the rise and fall of the Norse gods from the point of view of Loki, the trickster god who is often blamed for their downfall. In this article, we will review The Gospel of Loki by Joanne Harris, an EPUB file that you can download and read on your device. We will summarize the plot, analyze the characters and themes, evaluate the strengths and weaknesses, and provide some FAQs for further reading.




joanne harris the gospel of loki epub


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fvittuv.com%2F2ud1ve&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw1vP5fzERVLQOOX9RcZ0f7s



Introduction




The Gospel of Loki is a novel by Joanne Harris, a British author best known for her bestselling novel Chocolat. The book was published in 2014 as the first installment of her Loki series, followed by The Testament of Loki in 2018 and The Night Mare in 2020. The book is based on Harris' lifelong passion for Norse myths, which she learned from her grandfather who was a Norse scholar. The book is also inspired by Neil Gaiman's American Gods, which features Loki as one of the main characters.


The Gospel of Loki is a unique and creative retelling of the Norse myths from Loki's perspective. Unlike most versions of the myths that portray Loki as a villainous and treacherous figure, this book gives him a voice and a personality that is complex, humorous, and sympathetic. The book also challenges the traditional views of the Norse gods as noble and heroic, showing their flaws, conflicts, and prejudices. The book is not only a fascinating story of gods and monsters, but also a commentary on human nature, morality, and destiny.


The Gospel of Loki is a book that will appeal to readers who enjoy fantasy novels that are imaginative, entertaining, and thought-provoking. The book has a fast-paced plot that covers many events and characters from the Norse myths, such as Odin, Thor, Freya, Balder, Fenrir, Hel, Ragnarok, etc. The book also has a witty and sarcastic tone that makes the reader laugh and empathize with Loki, even when he does questionable things. The book also explores some deep and relevant themes, such as fate, free will, chaos, identity, loyalty, betrayal, etc.


Summary of The Gospel of Loki




The Gospel of Loki is divided into four books: Light, Shadow, Sunset, and Twilight. Each book contains several lessons that narrate the events and experiences of Loki from his recruitment to his betrayal of the gods.


In Book 1: Light, Loki tells how he was recruited by Odin, the king of the gods, from the underworld of Chaos. He was promised a place among the gods in Asgard, the realm of light and order. He was also given a new name, Loki Silvertongue, and a new form, a handsome and charming man. He soon became involved in many adventures and exploits with the gods, such as building the walls of Asgard, stealing the apples of immortality, obtaining Thor's hammer, etc. He also made many friends and enemies among the gods, such as Freya, Idun, Heimdall, etc.


In Book 2: Shadow, Loki tells how he began to feel restless and bored in Asgard. He started to seek more excitement and mischief, often causing trouble for the gods and himself. He also became more aware of the differences and tensions between him and the other gods. He felt that he was not truly accepted or respected by them, and that he was always bound by their rules and expectations. He also learned more about his origins and destiny from the Norns, the goddesses of fate. He discovered that he was destined to betray the gods and bring about their doom in Ragnarok, the final battle.


In Book 3: Sunset, Loki tells how he became more rebellious and resentful towards the gods. He started to act more openly against them, such as killing Balder, the beloved son of Odin; freeing Fenrir, the monstrous wolf; and joining forces with Hel, the goddess of death. He also became more isolated and lonely, as he lost most of his friends and allies among the gods. He also faced more challenges and dangers from his enemies, such as being tortured by a venomous snake; being hunted by Thor; and being imprisoned in a cave.


In Book 4: Twilight, Loki tells how he escaped from his prison and joined the forces of Chaos in Ragnarok. He led an army of giants, monsters, and outcasts against the gods and their allies. He fought against many of his former friends and foes, such as Odin, Thor, Freya, Heimdall, etc. He also witnessed the death and destruction of many gods and realms. He finally faced his own fate and destiny, as he was killed by Heimdall in a duel. However, he also hinted that he might not be truly dead or gone.


Analysis of The Gospel of Loki




The Gospel of Loki is a novel that offers a fresh and original perspective on the Norse myths. The novel uses humor, irony, and sarcasm to portray Loki's character and voice. The novel also explores the concepts of fate, free will, and chaos to examine Loki's motivations and actions. The novel also compares and contrasts Loki with other gods and characters to show his complexity and ambiguity.


One of the main features of the novel is the use of humor, irony, and sarcasm to portray Loki's character and voice. The novel is written in a first-person narrative that allows the reader to see the events from Loki's point of view. Loki is a witty and sarcastic narrator who often makes jokes and comments about himself, the gods, and the myths. He also uses irony to highlight the contradictions and absurdities of his situation. For example,


"I suppose you could call me a god," I said modestly. "A god?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. "Of what?" said Odin. "Of fire," I said. "Fire?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. "And mischief," I added. "Mischief?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. "And stories," I added. "Stories?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. "And lies," I added. "Lies?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. "And chaos," I added. "Chaos?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. "And truth," I added. "Truth?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. He looked at me for a long time. "You're lying," he said at last. I grinned. "Maybe," I said.


This passage shows how Loki uses humor to introduce himself to Odin as a god of many things that are often contradictory or paradoxical. He also uses irony to show how he is both lying and Continuing the article: One of the main features of the novel is the use of humor, irony, and sarcasm to portray Loki's character and voice. The novel is written in a first-person narrative that allows the reader to see the events from Loki's point of view. Loki is a witty and sarcastic narrator who often makes jokes and comments about himself, the gods, and the myths. He also uses irony to highlight the contradictions and absurdities of his situation. For example,


"I suppose you could call me a god," I said modestly. "A god?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. "Of what?" said Odin. "Of fire," I said. "Fire?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. "And mischief," I added. "Mischief?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. "And stories," I added. "Stories?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. "And lies," I added. "Lies?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. "And chaos," I added. "Chaos?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. "And truth," I added. "Truth?" said Odin. "Yes," I said. He looked at me for a long time. "You're lying," he said at last. I grinned. "Maybe," I said.


This passage shows how Loki uses humor to introduce himself to Odin as a god of many things that are often contradictory or paradoxical. He also uses irony to show how he is both lying and telling the truth at the same time, and how Odin is unable to understand him.


Another feature of the novel is the exploration of the concepts of fate, free will, and chaos in relation to Loki's motivations and actions. The novel shows how Loki is bound by fate, which is determined by the Norns, the goddesses of destiny. The Norns carve or weave the fates of all beings into the world tree Yggdrasil, which connects all the realms of the cosmos. The Norns also reveal some aspects of fate to those who can see or hear them, such as seers, prophets, or Loki himself. The novel shows how fate is inexorable and implacable, and how it affects both gods and humans. For example,


"The Norns have spoken," he [Odin] said. "Ragnarok will come. It cannot be avoided." I shrugged. "So what? Everything ends eventually. Even us." He looked at me with pity. "You don't understand. Ragnarok is not just an end. It's a beginning. A new cycle of creation and destruction. A new chance for life." I snorted. "And you think you'll be part of it? You think you'll survive the twilight of the gods?" He shook his head. "No. I know I won't. Neither will you. Neither will any of us. We are doomed, Loki. All of us." I laughed. "Speak for yourself, old man. I'm not doomed. I'm free."


This passage shows how Odin accepts his fate as decreed by the Norns, while Loki rejects it and claims his freedom. However, the novel also shows how Loki's freedom is an illusion, and how he is actually a pawn of fate and chaos. Loki is not only fated to betray the gods and cause their downfall, but he is also influenced by his chaotic nature, which makes him unpredictable, impulsive, and restless. He often acts without thinking of the consequences, or out of spite, boredom, or curiosity. He also has a tendency to lie, manipulate, and deceive others and himself. He is unable to control his emotions or impulses, and he often regrets his actions later. He is also conflicted about his identity and loyalty, as he belongs to neither the gods nor the giants, neither order nor chaos.


A third feature of the novel is the comparison and contrast of Loki with other gods and characters in the Norse myths. The novel shows how Loki is different from and similar to other beings in various ways.


  • Loki is different from most of the gods in terms of his origin, appearance, abilities, personality, and values. He comes from Chaos, while most of the gods come from Ymir's body or Buri's lineage. He can change his shape and gender at will, while most of the gods have fixed forms. He has no special weapon or attribute, while most of the gods have their own symbols and domains. He is cunning, clever, and creative, while most of the gods are simple, straightforward, and conservative. He values freedom, fun, and change, while most of the gods value order, duty, and stability.



  • Loki is similar to some of the gods in terms of his relationships, roles, and actions. He is a blood-brother of Odin, the king of the gods, and a friend and companion of Thor, the strongest of the gods. He is also a father of several children who play important roles in the Norse myths, such as Fenrir, Jormungand, Hel, Sleipnir, etc. He is also a helper and a hinderer of the gods, as he often assists them in their quests and troubles, but also causes them problems and conflicts.



  • Loki is different from most of the giants in terms of his size, shape, intelligence, and attitude. He is smaller than most of the giants, and he can assume human or animal forms. He is smarter than most of the giants, and he can outwit them with his tricks and lies. He is also more friendly and curious about the gods and humans than most of the giants, who are hostile and indifferent to them.



  • Loki is similar to some of the giants in terms of his ancestry, nature, and destiny. He is a son of Farbauti, a giant of fire, and Laufey, a giantess of leaves. He is also a brother of Helblindi and Byleist, two other giants. He is also a part of chaos, which is the source and enemy of the gods. He is also fated to join the giants in Ragnarok against the gods.



These comparisons and contrasts show how Loki is a complex and ambiguous character who defies easy categorization or judgment. He is neither good nor evil, neither friend nor foe, neither god nor giant. He is Loki Silvertongue, the god of fire and mischief, stories and lies, chaos and truth.


Evaluation of The Gospel of Loki




The Gospel of Loki is a novel that has many strengths and weaknesses as a fantasy novel that retells the Norse myths from Loki's perspective. The novel has many positive aspects that make it enjoyable and interesting to read. The novel also has some negative aspects that make it less satisfying or convincing to some readers.


Some of the strengths of the novel are:


  • The novel has a creative and original premise that gives a new twist to the familiar stories of Norse mythology. The novel shows how the myths can be interpreted differently depending on who tells them and how they tell them. The novel also adds some details and elements that are not found in the original sources, such as Loki's childhood in Chaos, his relationship with Angrboda, his involvement in Ragnarok, etc.



  • The novel has a humorous and engaging tone that makes the reader laugh and sympathize with Loki's plight. The novel uses sarcasm, irony, and exaggeration to make fun of the gods, the myths, and Loki himself. The novel also uses colloquial language and modern references to make the story more accessible and relatable to contemporary readers.



  • The novel has a fast-paced plot that covers many events and characters from Norse mythology. The novel follows Loki's adventures from his recruitment by Odin to his escape from his prison. The novel includes many famous episodes from the myths, such as Loki's theft of Idun's apples; Thor's journey to Utgard; Balder's death; etc. The novel also introduces many characters from Norse mythology, such as Odin; Thor; Freya; Fenrir; Hel; etc.



Some of the weaknesses of the novel are:


  • The novel has a simplistic and biased portrayal of Loki's character and voice. The novel makes Loki too sympathetic and likable at the expense of other characters who are often portrayed as stupid or cruel. The novel also makes Loki too consistent and coherent in his motivations and actions, Continuing the article: ignoring or downplaying his flaws and contradictions. The novel also makes Loki's voice too modern and anachronistic, using slang and references that do not fit the historical and cultural context of the Norse myths.



  • The novel has a superficial and selective adaptation of the Norse myths and their sources. The novel does not follow the original sources of the myths, such as the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda, closely or consistently. The novel also omits or alters some aspects of the myths that do not suit Loki's narrative or agenda. For example, the novel does not mention Loki's role in the death of Odin's son Hodr; Loki's marriage to Sigyn; Loki's transformation into a mare and giving birth to Sleipnir; etc. The novel also adds some elements that are not found in the original sources, such as Loki's childhood in Chaos; Loki's relationship with Angrboda; Loki's involvement in Ragnarok; etc.



  • The novel has a limited and repetitive scope and structure that make it boring and predictable to read. The novel follows a similar pattern in each book and lesson: Loki gets involved in some trouble with the gods or the giants; he tries to fix it with his tricks or lies; he succeeds or fails; he faces some consequences or escapes; he learns something about his fate or himself; he moves on to the next trouble. The novel also does not develop or change Loki's character or voice much throughout the story. He remains mostly the same person from the beginning to the end, despite his experiences and revelations.



These strengths and weaknesses show how The Gospel of Loki is a novel that has both merits and flaws as a fantasy novel that retells the Norse myths from Loki's perspective. The novel has some aspects that make it enjoyable and interesting to read, but also some aspects that make it less satisfying or convincing to some readers.


Conclusion




The Gospel of Loki by Joanne Harris is a fantasy novel that retells the Norse myths from Loki's perspective. The novel is a creative and original premise that gives a new twist to the familiar stories of Norse mythology. The novel is also a humorous and engaging tone that makes the reader laugh and sympathize with Loki's plight. The novel also has a fast-paced plot that covers many events and characters from Norse mythology.


The novel also has some weaknesses that make it less satisfying or convincing to some readers. The novel has a simplistic and biased portrayal of Loki's character and voice. The novel also has a superficial and selective adaptation of the Norse myths and their sources. The novel also has a limited and repetitive scope and structure that make it boring and predictable to read.


The Gospel of Loki is a novel that will appeal to readers who enjoy fantasy novels that are imaginative, entertaining, and thought-provoking. The novel is also a novel that will challenge readers who are familiar with or interested in Norse mythology. The novel is a novel that will make readers think about fate, free will, chaos, identity, loyalty, betrayal, and truth.


FAQs




  • Who is Loki in Norse mythology?Loki is a god or a giant (or both) in Norse mythology. He is the son of Farbauti and Laufey, and the brother of Helblindi and Byleist. He is also the blood-brother of Odin, the king of the gods, and the father of several children who play important roles in Norse mythology, such as Fenrir, Jormungand, Hel, Sleipnir, etc. He is known as the trickster god who often causes trouble for the gods and himself with his lies and mischief. He is also fated to betray the gods and cause their downfall in Ragnarok, the final battle.



  • What is an EPUB file and how can readers access it?An EPUB file is an electronic publication file format that can be read on various devices such as computers, tablets, smartphones, e-readers, etc. It is a popular file format for digital books because it allows for flexible layout, reflowable text, embedded images, metadata, etc. Readers can access an EPUB file by downloading it from online platforms such as Amazon Kindle Store, Google Play Books, Apple Books, Kobo Store, etc., or by transferring it from their computer to their device using software such as Calibre, Adobe Digital Editions, etc.



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